Construction artisans bemoan low patronage

The Building and Construction Skilled Artisans Association of Nigeria has decried the low patronage of indigenous artisans’ services, ascribing it to the influx of foreign artisans into the country.

The association’s President, Alhaji Muhammad Fasasi, said the federal and state governments, corporate organisations and individuals should employ more of indigenous artisans instead of foreign artisans to work on construction projects in the country.

Fasasi told newsmen that there was an influx of artisans from Africa and Asia into the construction industry in the country.

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He said that this had been responsible for the little or no demand for the services of local artisans.

“The association is training its members to meet the international standard for effective service delivery. With the kind of orientation and training we are giving to BACSAAN members now, none will deliver substandard service,”he said.

The President, Nigerian Institute of Building, Mr Kenneth Nduka, said the development was due to the laziness of many Nigerian artisans.

Nduka tasked them to improve their skills to justify their clamour for patronage, adding that most Nigerian artisans lacked the requisite knowledge and skills for efficient service delivery like the foreign artisans.

According to the NIOB president, a greater percentage of the causes of building collapse in Nigeria can be traced to the incompetence of indigenous artisans.

“Today, most buildings in Nigeria have fundamental faults because our artisans are either half-baked or not baked at all. Nigeria cannot grow until we begin to utilise the services of people who are trained and properly skilled in technical things,’’ Nduka said.

A former Chairman of the Nigerian Institution of Estate Surveyors and Valuers, Lagos Chapter, Mr Samuel Ukpong, also decried the poor remuneration of the local artisans.

While he noted that good work must be well paid for, he described poor remuneration as one of the key factors affecting their performance.

He was particularly disturbed by the influx of foreign artisans from Asia and the neighbouring West African countries into the country to take up jobs that should have been done by indigenous artisans.

According to him, over 5,000 artisans from one of the Asian countries are working in Nigeria.

“In a country with several millions of unemployed youths, for no reason must we allow or patronise services of foreigners. If the indigenous artisans lack the skills, let them undergo the appropriate training to upgrade their knowledge. Nigeria cannot continue to depend on foreign technology in the construction industry,’’ he said.

He emphasised the need for the establishment of a National Construction Industry Board to regulate the sector and ensure proper training of Nigerians to work on construction sites.

Source: Punch

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Liberia President Launches Low Income Housing in Rural Areas

Liberia President, has launched a housing program for rural dwellers known as the Sasstown development project targeted toward a better living environment.

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The former World best footballer took to his official social media page to make the announcement on Sunday, March 3.

President Weah revealed he was excited with the project expected to improve living condition of Liberians, who will be encouraged to go into agriculture after the residential buildings are ready.

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“I’m excited to announce that my vision to transform the standard of living of our rural dwellers, precisely by upgrading their homes from mud brick homes to concrete homes; has started with the Sasstown development project,” President Weah’s statement read in part.

A further breakdown of the Sasstown development project revealed that existing residential cities will be converted to agricultural zones once the new buildings are completed.

In an effort to avoid demolition of their existing homes; which will prevent them from being homeless during the construction period.

“We have devised a strategy wherein we will build the new homes at a different location; and once the construction is done, they can then move into the newly constructed homes while we demolish the old ones and encourage them to do agriculture at the site of their old homes,” he said.

The President assured Liberians that his government would use every available cent on developing the country..

Source: Legit.ng

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Affordable Housing in Africa

Rapid urbanization is pushing up demand for housing in Sub-Saharan Africa.

African cities become the new home to over 40,000 people every day, many of whom find themselves without a roof over their heads.

With that in mind, IFC has committed to do more to develop the property sector, both to provide new and affordable housing and to encourage an industry that requires significant building materials and has the potential to be a major employer.

In May, IFC and Chinese multinational construction and engineering company, CITIC Construction launched a $300 million investment platform, CITICC (Africa) Holding Limited, to develop affordable housing in multiple African countries.

African cities become the new home to over 40,000 people every day, many of whom find themselves without a roof over their heads. With that in mind, IFC has committed to do more to develop the property sector, both to provide new and affordable housing and to encourage an industry that requires significant building materials and has the potential to be a major employer. In May, IFC and Chinese multinational construction and engineering company, CITIC Construction launched a $300 million investment platform, CITICC (Africa) Holding Limited, to develop affordable housing in multiple African countries. The platform will partner with local housing developers and provide long-term capital to develop 30,000 homes over next five years. IFC estimates that each housing unit will create five full-time jobs – resulting in nearly 150,000 new jobs on the continent. Kenya and Nigeria are high on the priority list for the new effort. Kenya’s housing shortage is estimated at 2 million units, while Nigeria is in want of 17 million units. The soaring demand is being met by scant new supply. Africa’s housing market has few local developers with the technical and financial strength to construct large-scale projects. The IFC-CITIC Construction platform will work with local housing companies to develop affordable housing projects across Sub-Saharan Africa, each ranging in size from 2,000 to 8,000 units. CITIC Construction has a proven track record in constructing and delivering large scale housing projects. The platform will start by developing homes in Kenya, Rwanda and Nigeria, expanding to other countries as operations ramp up. “In Angola, through planning, financing, construction and post-construction operation, CITIC Construction has successfully completed the 200,000 units housing program, new city of Kilamba Kiaxi, with relative infrastructure and utilities in four years. CITIC Construction has also founded the CITIC BN Vocational School in Angola which helps youth acquire the skills they need to become professionals”, said Hong Bo, Assistant President of CITIC Group and Chairwoman of CITIC Construction, “CITIC Construction will take advantage of our engineering experience and delivery capability to develop more affordable houses for Africa through the platform with IFC.” “As Sub-Saharan Africa become more urbanized, the private sector can help governments meet the critical need for housing”, said Oumar Seydi, IFC Director for Eastern and Southern Africa. “The platform will help transform Africa’s housing markets by providing high quality, affordable homes, creating jobs, and demonstrating the viability of the sector to local developers. IFC will work with financial institutions to support mortgages and housing finance that will allow people to purchase the units.” The new housing units will be constructed in accordance to IFC’s green building standards, delivering homes that are environmentally friendly and sustainable. The World Bank Group estimates that by 2030, three billion people, or 40 percent of the world’s population will need new housing units. To date, IFC has invested more than $3 billion in housing finance in over 46 countries world-wide. IFC focuses on regions where large portions of the population live in sub-standard housing and have limited access to credit to build, expand, or renovate their homes.

The platform will partner with local housing developers and provide long-term capital to develop 30,000 homes over next five years. IFC estimates that each housing unit will create five full-time jobs – resulting in nearly 150,000 new jobs on the continent.

Kenya and Nigeria are high on the priority list for the new effort. Kenya’s housing shortage is estimated at 2 million units, while Nigeria is in want of 17 million units. The soaring demand is being met by scant new supply. Africa’s housing market has few local developers with the technical and financial strength to construct large-scale projects.

The IFC-CITIC Construction platform will work with local housing companies to develop affordable housing projects across Sub-Saharan Africa, each ranging in size from 2,000 to 8,000 units.

CITIC Construction has a proven track record in constructing and delivering large scale housing projects. The platform will start by developing homes in Kenya, Rwanda and Nigeria, expanding to other countries as operations ramp up.

“In Angola, through planning, financing, construction and post-construction operation, CITIC Construction has successfully completed the 200,000 units housing program, new city of Kilamba Kiaxi, with relative infrastructure and utilities in four years.

CITIC Construction has also founded the CITIC BN Vocational School in Angola which helps youth acquire the skills they need to become professionals”, said Hong Bo, Assistant President of CITIC Group and Chairwoman of CITIC Construction, “CITIC Construction will take advantage of our engineering experience and delivery capability to develop more affordable houses for Africa through the platform with IFC.”

“As Sub-Saharan Africa become more urbanized, the private sector can help governments meet the critical need for housing”, said Oumar Seydi, IFC Director for Eastern and Southern Africa.

“The platform will help transform Africa’s housing markets by providing high quality, affordable homes, creating jobs, and demonstrating the viability of the sector to local developers.

IFC will work with financial institutions to support mortgages and housing finance that will allow people to purchase the units.”

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The new housing units will be constructed in accordance to IFC’s green building standards, delivering homes that are environmentally friendly and sustainable.

The World Bank Group estimates that by 2030, three billion people, or 40 percent of the world’s population will need new housing units.

To date, IFC has invested more than $3 billion in housing finance in over 46 countries world-wide.

IFC focuses on regions where large portions of the population live in sub-standard housing and have limited access to credit to build, expand, or renovate their homes.

 

Source: ifc.org

Johannesburg: Authorities Urge Developers To Devote 30% of New Residential Units To Social Housing

The City of Johannesburg is to compel private-property developers to dedicate 30% of their new developments to low-income earners.

This applies to all developments to be built in areas within the jurisdiction of the City of Joburg’s municipality.

The city adopted their inclusionary housing policy last week and the isolation of low-income earners from the city will soon be a thing of the past, officials insist.

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The goal of the policy is to do away with inequality by ensuring the integration of people who fall into different income brackets and different race groups into the city centre. This should have an ongoing effect into the inner city’s amenities and businesses as well as on job opportunities.

The policy does not limit the accommodation of low-income earners to specific areas only, which means that developers who take up projects in more affluent areas of the city will still be compelled to abide by the policy.

According to Moneyweb,some property developers were critical of the policy. The South African Property Owners Association lamented the city’s disregard of the concerns they had brought forth at the proposal of the policy last year.

Property developers have four options for inclusionary housing to choose from, including setting aside 30% of the entire development to social housing, finance-linked individual subsidy (Flisp), or capped rent.

With this last option, the city says rent will be capped at R21,000 (in 2018 prices) for people earning R7,000 a month or less.

The policy will be effective as of May 2019.

Source: timeslive.co.za

Queen Latifah Gives Out $14 Million in Affordable Housing in Newark

After conquering the entertainment industry, and leaving an indelible mark on music, film and television, multi-hyphenate Queen Latifah is looking to extend her reign by giving back to her hometown of Newark, N.J.

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Through her company BlueSugar Corporation, the 48-year-old will partner with GonSosa Development to develop $14 million in affording housing for residents of Brick City. The project is expected to break ground this summer.

Cristina Pinzon, speaking on behalf for the developers involved, noted that both companies “understand how difficult it is to make ends meet for many residents and want to be part of the solution.”

“They remain dedicated to making life better in communities like Newark,” she added in a statement.

The project includes 20 three-family townhomes, a three-story mixed-used building with an additional 16 units, a fitness center and 1,900 square feet of commercial space that will be rented to nonprofits. While the 60 units in the town houses will be market rate, the remaining 16 units in the building will be affordable.

And for those looking to make that move into the new properties, the market-rate units are expected to open by December 2020, while the affordable housing is expected to be complete by December 2021 and priced according to a person’s income.

Source: theroot.com

What are Habitat houses like around the world?

From the tropical islands of the Philippines to the mountains of Chile, Habitat builds houses designed for the local setting. Habitat builds with locally available materials by country, reducing costs and making it easier for homeowners to maintain the houses. For example, houses in many African countries are constructed with fired clay bricks and tile roofs made of cement or fired clay. Houses in Latin America often are built with concrete block or adobe walls and metal roofs. Houses in the Pacific are often built with wood frames and are constructed on stilts.

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People of different countries use their houses in different ways. Habitat’s house designs reflect these cultural considerations. Meals are cooked outdoors in many African countries; there, Habitat plans call for a kitchen area outside of the house. In the Philippines, laundry and other chores traditionally are done on a small outdoor utility porch, so Filipino Habitat house designs reflect this custom.

No matter where they are built, Habitat house sizes always are designed to meet the homeowner families’ needs while keeping costs as low and affordable as possible for low-income families.

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Some areas build with 6 inch hollow concrete blocks with steel rods to help the structure resist earthquakes, plus micro concrete roof tiles. In other places, houses are built with dry stacked interlocking compressed earth blocks on a stone rubble foundation with corrugated roofing sheets. A lime wash on the blocks offers weather resistance. The house design includes a cooking area, gable roof and pour flush toilet.

India

Meals and socializing occur on the porch. Houses are built of fired bricks for walls and steel-reinforced concrete roof slabs. Some houses are made with hollow-core concrete blocks and tile roofs.

Romania

The traditional block construction in Romania takes at least a year to build, but wood frame construction is quicker and more energy efficient. Stucco protects the house walls from weathering and locally made clay tiles finish the roof.

Guatemala

Houses made of hollow concrete blocks and steel rods are designed to resist earthquakes. The window coverings and doors can be made of wood; however, metal is used in some areas where wood is more expensive.

Zambia

The average Habitat Zambia house is constructed with burnt brick walls and corrugated iron roofing, replacing the less sturdy mud, wattle and grass thatch construction seen throughout much of the country. The end result is a two- or three-bedroom home with separate sleeping, cooking and living areas. Houses are designed so that homeowners have the option to expand the house as needed.

City of Sydney launches alternative housing ideas competition

The City of Sydney is set to launch an ideas competition in March that will collect and develop concepts for boosting the diversity of housing types across the city, “with a focus on identifying and developing new models to increase affordable housing supply.”

The council decided to hold the competition at a council meeting on 11 February.

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The Alternative Housing Ideas Challenge is open to anyone “with new ideas for the housing sector,” including designers, property professionals, financiers, lawyers, community organizers, policy managers, planners and students.

The aim of the Alternative Housing Ideas Challenge is to “prioritize development models that could be replicated across the local government area and beyond, to enable a broader range of affordable housing options to be considered and delivered.”

The challenge will help to inform the development of the council’s future Community Strategic Plan and Housing Policy.

A yet to be appointed jury will choose six participants to receive $20,000 each to further develop their ideas.

Submissions must adhere to a number of criteria. Most importantly, the model must be either cheaper to buy or rent, and innovation must be displayed in two of the following areas: planning, design, ownership type, tenancy type, management, construction, urban land supply and financing. The entries should also have a high level of amenity and be scalable and replicable.

Source: Architecture AU

Malaysia: Review of the National Housing Policy

After months of speculation, the National Housing Policy 2.0 or Dasar Perumahan Negara (DRN) 2018 – 2025 was launched by Housing and Local Government Ministry (KPKT) on Monday, 28 January 2019.

The policy was the result of wide public and private sector engagement to address various issues surrounding the housing market. Initiatives announced as part of this policy include:

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1. National Home Ownership Campaign

Under this campaign, the government is teaming up with developers and lenders to market about 30,115 completed houses at a discounted price in the upcoming property fair – Malaysia Property Expo (MAPEX 2019). Happening on 1 – 3rd March 2019 in KL Convention Centre, the campaign will see the participation of around 180 home builders and banks, which will help home buyers secure financing.

Part of the government’s effort to improve the living condition of low-cost housing residents within the PPR’s and other public housing schemes.

3. National Affordable Housing Council

In line with the PH Government’s manifesto, the council, chaired by Prime Minister  Dr. Mahathir Mohamad, will be in charge of monitoring affordable housing construction in the country, coordinating a database and to implement a self-renting scheme for the low and mid-income groups.

4.National Affordable Housing Policy (DPMM)

Clearer guidelines to be announced however among the focus areas include fixing property prices to between RM90,000 and RM300,000 depending on the location and average income of the local community as well as a minimum house size of 900 sq.ft. for properties within this price bracket.

5. Widening of the Rent-to-Own (RTO) Scheme

The RTO scheme is designed as an alternative form of home financing where home buyers can rent the property from the government for 5 years before obtaining end-financing in the 6th year to purchase the property outright.

These policies should be lauded for its focus on home ownership particularly for the B40 and a solution to the growing number of unsold units in the market or overhang. However, the policy as announced appears to focus squarely on addressing short-term demand related issues.

Notably absent is a plan to mitigate the factors that led to the current state of the market (ie. inflation, oversupply etc.).

The PH government in its manifesto had identified addressing landbanking or hoarding of prime development land by developers as well as the implementation of new building technology to reduce the cost of development. Initiatives crucial towards a healthy sustainable property market.

Coupled with revisions to RPGT and Stamp Duty including selected exemptions, the PH government appears to be taking short-term populist measures to managing what is a very complex and fragmented housing market.

Source: FMT News

Ekiti housing project ready for delivery by April

The South West Zonal Director of the Federal Government National Housing Project, Mr Olasunkanmi Dunmoye, has promised that willing residents of Ekiti State will get the houses built by the federal government for them by April this year,

Dunmoye stated this in Ado Ekiti yesterday during an inspection of the project, situated in the Agric Olope area of the state capital.

He said the housing project would cover 70 flats for the first phase, made up of one- bedroom, two-bedroom and three-bedroom flats, as well as semi-detached bungalows.

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He said the project was designed by the federal government in 2016 as part of ways to ameliorate the sufferings of poor Nigerians, especially in the area of affordable shelter.

According to him, more than half of the houses had been completed  while the remaining were in various stages of completion.

In the same vein, the road network project within the environment, as well as electrification and water provision, had equally reached between 40 and 70 per cent completion stage.

He explained that the housing project in Ekiti State could not be completed early, compared to some states, because the land originally allocated for that purpose by the Ekiti State government under the administration of former Governor Ayo Fayose was considered too far from the city centre.

“It was after then that we reached an agreement with the former government, which gave us an alternative land at the centre of the state capital where we are presently, but with a condition that we must rehabilitate the Agric Olope access road, which we have now done,” he said.

Dunmoye said a total of 15 contractors were engaged on site to prosecute the housing project, and no fewer than 1,750 persons were currently employed either directly or indirectly on site.

 

On complaints by some of the contractors that they had not been fully mobilized for jobs already done, the Zonal Director said the list of contractors affected would soon be compiled and sent to Abuja for clearance.

But he frowned at the attitude of some selected contractors for the housing project, who he said had refused to make appearances for the jobs ceded to them. He threatened that government would substitute them soon if they failed to turn over a new leaf.

The state Controller of Housing in the Federal Ministry of Power, Works and Housing, Mr Otegbade Oladiran and a Director with the ministry, Mrs Janet Ogunleye, who conducted the Zonal Director round the project site, gave assurances that all the components would be executed to specification.

Difference between A House and A Home

House is a permanent structure, a building.

House generally refers to a building in which someone lives.

But a house is still a house, even if there is no one living inside the building.

Example: We decided to sell the house and move back to Seattle.

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  • Home is the place where you live or the location where you feel that you belong, so a home can be a building or a location.

Home has more emotional feelings than the world house, it represents comfort, safety.

A home can also be the town/ city/ country where you grew up.

Example: Last night we stayed at home and watched TV.

How to Use HOUSE and HOME

Home acts similar to words like herethere, inoutsomewhere, …. House does not.

Ex: They have a beautiful home in Hong Kong

Home carries more respect than house, so you can use it when you want to be polite to someone.

Ex: Good luck in your new home!

When you’re talking to other people about your own place, you usually use house instead of home.

Ex: Why don’t you all come over to our house for coffee?

Difference between A House and A Home | Image

Difference between A House and A Home

Source: ESLBUZZ

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