Lagos Partners Family Homes Funds for 20,000 Housing Units

If discussions and strategies being advanced by all stakeholders are finally agreed upon, the Family Home Fund (FHF), Lagos State government and private developers will be sealing deals on large-scale housing development in Lagos, New Telegraph has learnt.

According to FHF’s Managing Director, Mr. Femi Adewole, in an interview with New Telegraph last weekend, the firm and the state government were exploring a potential partnership for a large-scale affordable housing scheme with a specific focus on Lagosians on low income.

Sighted in a meeting with officials of Lagos State government and Ecostone Limited, private developer’s firm in Ikeja, he disclosed that the partnership would include a significant element of regeneration, which would ensure that older parts of the city are brought back into use to provide much needed affordable homes.

The partnership, Adewole said, sought to build 20,000 housing units in the first phase, while targeting 100,000 units in all.

He pointed out that specific mechanism and roles of each party were currently under discussion, adding that the housing units would be massive and that many developers that meet the criteria would be engaged.

The FHF boss said: “The proposals involve a significant number of homes, so there is space for participation by a number of developers who meet the criteria and demonstrate that they are committed to the delivery of homes, which are affordable to Lagosians on very modest incomes since this is the area of interest for the Family Homes Funds.”

Apart from building good quality homes, Adewole added that the programme would be looking to create jobs for Lagosians.

“Other aspects of the scheme include a committment that we are not just to build housing units; we also need to tackle the environment and climate change issues which now stares us in the face,” he said. “This is important for future generations of Lagosians given that Lagos is a coastal city.”

He added that his firm would place priority on a very high level environmental sustainability standards and energy efficiency in order to respond to climate change challenges.

“As I said, discussions are going on; they are very fruitful and fully committed by all parties,” he said. “I hope that in a very near future, I will be in a position to announce a major partnership with the largest economy in Nigeria.”

The FHF boss said: “The proposals involve a significant number of homes, so there is space for participation by a number of developers who meet the criteria and demonstrate that they are committed to the delivery of homes, which are affordable to Lagosians on very modest incomes since this is the area of interest for the Family Homes Funds.”

Apart from building good quality homes, Adewole added that the programme would be looking to create jobs for Lagosians.

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“Other aspects of the scheme include a committment that we are not just to build housing units; we also need to tackle the environment and climate change issues which now stares us in the face,” he said. “This is important for future generations of Lagosians given that Lagos is a coastal city.”

He added that his firm would place priority on a very high level environmental sustainability standards and energy efficiency in order to respond to climate change challenges.

“As I said, discussions are going on; they are very fruitful and fully committed by all parties,” he said. “I hope that in a very near future, I will be in a position to announce a major partnership with the largest economy in Nigeria.”

Lagos State Commissioner for Housing, Mr. Gbolahan Lawal, officials of the ministry and that of Ecostone company, a private real estate development firm, were all sighted at the venue of the meeting.
Contacted for an interview, the commissioner declined comment.

Source: NewsTelegraph

Family Homes Funds seeks collaboration with developers on affordable housing scheme

As part of efforts at bridging the staggering housing demand-supply gap estimated at 3 million units in Lagos, Nigeria’s commercial capital, the Family Home Fund (FHF) was in the sprawling city recently to explore potential partnership for a large-scale affordable housing scheme with a specific focus on low income Lagos residents.

FHF is a special purpose investment vehicle which has the Nigerian Sovereign Investment Authorit (NSIA) and the Federal Ministry of Finance Incorporated as founding shareholders. It has an ambitious target of supporting the development of over 500,000 homes and creating 1.5m jobs for Nigerians on low income by 2023.

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So far, the fund has completed the construction of 400 homes with an average cost of N3.5 million in Grand Luvu, Nasarawa State  and this is part of over 4,000 homes under construction in five states of the federation namely Ogun, Nasarawa, Kano, Delta and Kaduna.

Femi Adewole, FHF’s managing director, disclosed in a brief interview in Lagos that the partnership which the fund was exploring would include a significant element of regeneration that would ensure that older parts of the city were brought back into use to provide much needed affordable homes.

With a large and growing population, estimated at 20 million, Lagos has a very challenging housing situation, especially at the low income level. It is estimated that 65 percent of its residents live in rented accommodation, spending over 50 percent of their income on house rents. This is as a result of lack of affordable homes in the city’s very expensive housing market.

The intervention by FHF is therefore considered critical and, according to Adewole, the proposals for the partnership involve a significant number of homes, assuring that there was space for participation by a number of developers who met theac criteria and demonstrated that they were committed to the delivery of homes that were affordable to Lagosians on very modest incomes since this was the area of interest for the Fund.

“We have a strong commitment. We have invested over N20 billion in housing projects to support Nigerians who are earning below N100, 000;  we are also providing financing for developers who will build homes ranging from N2.5 million to N5 million.  In addition, we are providing some assistance to the buyers of those houses and we are giving them a deferred loan for up to 40 percent cost of the houses’’, the managing director assured.

Besides providing quality homes, the fund will also be looking at creating jobs for Lagosians. Other aspects of the scheme include a commitment to the environment and climate change issues.

“This is important for future generations of Lagosians given that Lagos is a coastal  city. We think about the future of Lagos being a coastal city.  So far, discussions have been very fruitful and are now advanced. The partners are very committed. I’m hopeful that in the near-future, we will have a full announcement,” Adewole assured further.

Source: BusinessDay

Family Homes Funds seeks collaboration with developers on affordable housing scheme

As part of efforts at bridging the staggering housing demand-supply gap estimated at 3 million units in Lagos, Nigeria’s commercial capital, the Family Homes Funds (FHF) was in the sprawling city recently to explore potential partnership for a large-scale affordable housing scheme with a specific focus on low income Lagos residents.

FHF is a special purpose investment vehicle which has the Nigerian Sovereign Investment Authorit (NSIA) and the Federal Ministry of Finance Incorporated as founding shareholders. It has an ambitious target of supporting the development of over 500,000 homes and creating 1.5m jobs for Nigerians on low income by 2023.

So far, the fund has completed the construction of 400 homes with an average cost of N3.5 million in Grand Luvu, Nasarawa State  and this is part of over 4,000 homes under construction in five states of the federation namely Ogun, Nasarawa, Kano, Delta and Kaduna.

Femi Adewole, FHF’s managing director, disclosed in a brief interview in Lagos that the partnership which the fund was exploring would include a significant element of regeneration that would ensure that older parts of the city were brought back into use to provide much needed affordable homes.

With a large and growing population, estimated at 20 million, Lagos has a very challenging housing situation, especially at the low income level. It is estimated that 65 percent of its residents live in rented accommodation, spending over 50 percent of their income on house rents. This is as a result of lack of affordable homes in the city’s very expensive housing market.

The intervention by FHF is therefore considered critical and, according to Adewole, the proposals for the partnership involve a significant number of homes, assuring that there was space for participation by a number of developers who met theac criteria and demonstrated that they were committed to the delivery of homes that were affordable to Lagosians on very modest incomes since this was the area of interest for the Fund.

“We have a strong commitment. We have invested over N20 billion in housing projects to support Nigerians who are earning below N100, 000;  we are also providing financing for developers who will build homes ranging from N2.5 million to N5 million.  In addition, we are providing some assistance to the buyers of those houses and we are giving them a deferred loan for up to 40 percent cost of the houses’’, the managing director assured.

Besides providing quality homes, the fund will also be looking at creating jobs for Lagosians. Other aspects of the scheme include a commitment to the environment and climate change issues.

“This is important for future generations of Lagosians given that Lagos is a coastal  city. We think about the future of Lagos being a coastal city.  So far, discussions have been very fruitful and are now advanced. The partners are very committed. I’m hopeful that in the near-future, we will have a full announcement,” Adewole assured further.

Source: Business Day

Ghana to commence construction of 100,000 affordable housing project

Ghana is set to commence construction of 100,000 housing units project which is in line with Akufo-Addo’s plan to provide affordable housing for the low and middle-income earners in the country.

A Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) was reached between Sidre EPCM Yatirim Turism A.S, a Turkish company and HS Kodana Comapny Linited to signify the start of the project.

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Housing deficit

Speaking during the signing ceremony,Deputy Minister of Housing, Freda Prempeh, said Ghana needs at least 100,000 housing units each year to address its housing deficit, which is in the range of two million.

The housing sector is highly unregulated and, thus, owners operate within no established framework and set prices as they deem fit contributing to the widening housing deficit in the country.

Mr. Freda also noted that the Ministry of Works and Housing was in consultation with the Ministry of Finance to issue the two parties with the requisite guarantee of international consequence via a bank or any financial institution agreeable to all stakeholders relating to each year’s delivery of housing units in the country.

 

The 100,000 units are to be constructed across the 16 regions of Ghana over the next four years. The Turkish company is to kick-start the project this year with about 5,000 units.

Ghana’s housing sector is highly unregulated. Homeowners and landlords operate within no established framework and set prices as they deem fit contributing to the widening housing deficit in the country.

The costs are influenced by several factors including location, size, amenities and proximity to facilities such as malls and hospitals among others.

Source: Construction Review Online

Help-to-buy scheme pushes housebuilder profits to £2.3bn

Britain’s biggest housebuilders paid out £2.3bn in dividends in their most recent financial year, as the help-to-buy subsidy pumped up their profits and house prices.

The nine biggest housebuilders listed on the London Stock Exchange declared the dividend payouts in their last full financial years, according to an analysis by AJ Bell, an investment platform.

Help to buy, introduced in 2013 and recently extended until 2023 for first-time buyers, was one of the flagship policies of the coalition government. Former Conservative chancellor George Osborne hoped to boost home ownership among young people, as house price growth far outpaced wage growth

However, many economists believe the scheme boosted house prices without making a significant impact on the supply of new houses, enabling a profits bonanza for Britain’s biggest house builders and their shareholders.


In 2012, the final full year before the help-to-buy scheme was introduced, the top nine firms – many of which had been battered by the financial crash – paid dividends of only £57.7m, according to AJ Bell. Dividends declared in the companies’ most recent financial year were about 39 times greater.

Since 2013 the nine house builders have paid out nearly £8bn in dividends, while City analysts forecast another £5.2bn in payouts in 2019 and 2020. Furthermore, shareholders have also enjoyed appreciation in housebuilders’ share prices, which have been sustained by the promise of further profits.

Persimmon, half of whose sales were part of help to buy, was responsible for 2018’s largest giveaway. Its shareholders collectively earned £732m in dividends in the year ending in December, after the company earned more than £1bn in profits.

Taylor Wimpey declared dividends of slightly less than £500m during the same period. Barratt Developments declared £435m in the year ending in June 2018. Bellway, Berkeley Group and Bovis all declared dividends of more than £120m in their last full financial year.

The large profits of housebuilders have attracted heavy criticism, amid a continued housing crisis and rising homelessness. Persimmon’s former chief executive, Jeff Fairburn, resigned in November following public fury over his £75m bonus, which had been scaled back from £110m after investor outrage.

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Greg Beales, the director of campaigns at the homelessness charity Shelter, said: “As all the big housebuilders announce soaring profits whilst the housing crisis worsens it couldn’t be clearer our housing market is broken. Whilst the big developers are doing better than ever, regular families are finding it harder and harder to afford somewhere to live.

“Disjointed schemes such as help to buy have only made things worse by inflating house prices and giving big developers a leg-up, while doing almost nothing to for those most in need of a genuinely affordable home.”

Under the help-to-buy equity loan, the government provides a low-interest loan worth up to 20% of the value of the property (or 40% in London) for prospective buyers of new-build homes, up to a maximum price of £600,000. The buyer needs to provide at least a 5% deposit and secure a mortgage for the rest.

A spokesman for the Home Builders Federation, an industry lobby group, said: “Home builders do not receive funding from help to buy but by supporting first-time buyers, the scheme has helped drive an unprecedented 80% increase in housing supply in five years, creating tens of thousands of jobs and boosting the UK economy to the tune of £38bn last year.”

However, the help-to-buy scheme has faced criticism across the political spectrum, from the Adam Smith Institute, a libertarian think tank, to the Labour party – although Labour is committed to keeping the scheme open until 2027 for first-time buyers below a certain income level.

Labour’s shadow housing secretary, John Healey, said: “Conservative ministers have given private housebuilders a free hand to make bumper profits off the back of homebuyers.

“Labour will turn the broken housing market on its head – putting low-cost new homes at the heart of our plan to rebuild Britain.”

The Office for Budget Responsibility, which provides the government’s official forecasts, in October said it expects the government to spend another £20bn on the help-to-buy scheme between the current financial year and 2022-23. The two-year extension of the scheme is expected to cost £7.3bn.

A Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government spokesperson said: “This government is committed to helping more people get on the housing ladder as we power through to delivering 300,000 homes a year by the mid-2020s. Our help to buy equity loan scheme has helped more than 190,000 households buy their home, helping to make the dream of home ownership a reality for a new generation.”

Source: Guardian

Letting adverts that discriminate against tenants on housing benefit could be banned

Ministers in England are set to meet representatives of landlord associations, tenant groups, property websites and mortgage providers in a bid to clamp down on discrimination against people on housing benefit in the private rented sector.

Housing Minister Heather Wheeler said that adverts which specify that a home will not be rented to people on housing benefit could be banned and she called on landlords and letting agents to stop saying No to DSS claimants.

 

She pointed out that out of 4.5 million households living in private rental accommodation, 889,000 receive housing benefit to help pay their rent. Yet the latest figures show around half of landlords said they would not be willing to let to tenants on Housing Benefit.

‘I will be meeting key stakeholders to tackle the practice of No DSS, to underline the need for immediate change,’ Wheeler confirmed.

Justin Tomlinson, Minister for Family Support, Housing and Child Maintenance, said that everyone should have the same opportunity when looking for a home, regardless of whether they are in receipt of benefits.

‘With Universal Credit, payments can be paid directly to the landlord, and we continue to listen to feedback and work with landlords to improve the system.

Landlords can already receive rent from tenants on Housing Benefit and Universal Credit, meaning payments can be paid directly into their accounts,’ he pointed out.

Wheeler also announced that some £19.5 million is to be provided to local authorities in England to provide homes for people at risk of losing their or who are already homeless, it has been announced

Wheeler said that it will help people to get into the rented sector and the funding will go to 54 projects around the country.

Councils will use the funding boost to help vulnerable people secure their own tenancy through support such as, paying deposits or putting down the first months’ rent and Wheeler said that th

African cities become the new home to over 40,000 people every day, many of whom find themselves without a roof over their heads. With that in mind, IFC has committed to do more to develop the property sector, both to provide new and affordable housing and to encourage an industry that requires significant building materials and has the potential to be a major employer. In May, IFC and Chinese multinational construction and engineering company, CITIC Construction launched a $300 million investment platform, CITICC (Africa) Holding Limited, to develop affordable housing in multiple African countries. The platform will partner with local housing developers and provide long-term capital to develop 30,000 homes over next five years. IFC estimates that each housing unit will create five full-time jobs – resulting in nearly 150,000 new jobs on the continent. Kenya and Nigeria are high on the priority list for the new effort. Kenya’s housing shortage is estimated at 2 million units, while Nigeria is in want of 17 million units. The soaring demand is being met by scant new supply. Africa’s housing market has few local developers with the technical and financial strength to construct large-scale projects. The IFC-CITIC Construction platform will work with local housing companies to develop affordable housing projects across Sub-Saharan Africa, each ranging in size from 2,000 to 8,000 units. CITIC Construction has a proven track record in constructing and delivering large scale housing projects. The platform will start by developing homes in Kenya, Rwanda and Nigeria, expanding to other countries as operations ramp up. “In Angola, through planning, financing, construction and post-construction operation, CITIC Construction has successfully completed the 200,000 units housing program, new city of Kilamba Kiaxi, with relative infrastructure and utilities in four years. CITIC Construction has also founded the CITIC BN Vocational School in Angola which helps youth acquire the skills they need to become professionals”, said Hong Bo, Assistant President of CITIC Group and Chairwoman of CITIC Construction, “CITIC Construction will take advantage of our engineering experience and delivery capability to develop more affordable houses for Africa through the platform with IFC.” “As Sub-Saharan Africa become more urbanized, the private sector can help governments meet the critical need for housing”, said Oumar Seydi, IFC Director for Eastern and Southern Africa. “The platform will help transform Africa’s housing markets by providing high quality, affordable homes, creating jobs, and demonstrating the viability of the sector to local developers. IFC will work with financial institutions to support mortgages and housing finance that will allow people to purchase the units.” The new housing units will be constructed in accordance to IFC’s green building standards, delivering homes that are environmentally friendly and sustainable. The World Bank Group estimates that by 2030, three billion people, or 40 percent of the world’s population will need new housing units. To date, IFC has invested more than $3 billion in housing finance in over 46 countries world-wide. IFC focuses on regions where large portions of the population live in sub-standard housing and have limited access to credit to build, expand, or renovate their homes.is should give them an opportunity to make a home in a property they may otherwise not have been able to access.

‘I want everyone to have the security, dignity and opportunities they need to build a better life and at the heart of which is ensuring everyone can find a safe and secure home to call their own,’ said Wheeler.

‘This funding will make a huge difference in opening up the private rented sector to people who need it and give them the chance to rebuild their lives.

This helps strengthen the choices and opportunities available for those on benefits to secure the homes they and their families need,’ she added.

In a third move, local authorities can now also bid for a share of up to £26 million of Rapid Rehousing Pathway funding for 2019 to 2020.

This extra investment can be used to fund innovative local schemes which help those sleeping rough and struggling with mental health problems or substance misuse issues.

The Private Rented Sector Access Fund will also support minimum tenancies or existing tenancies for a period of 12 months.

Source: Propertywire

Cities Alliance Calls for Proposals

Cities Alliance, a global partnership supporting cities to deliver sustainable development, hosted by the United Nations Office for Projects Services (UNOPS) is offering grants up to USD $50,000 to people working on innovative and accessible solutions for improving tenure security, land and property rights in African countries.

A statement from the organisation explained that rapidly growing cities like Nigeria struggle to support people living in overcrowded slum settlements.

“Many of these residents live in unsanitary conditions and with the constant threat of corruption and forced eviction—all because they lack legal or formal protection to the places they live and work.

“There is a growing number of people trying to solve this problem, and Cities Alliance wants to make sure they have the funding they need to grow and scale their promising solutions,” it added.

According to the statement, those eligible to apply include innovators, microenterprises, social entrepreneurs, community-based organisations, and national and local NGOs working in African cities.

The deadline for the submission of proposal is March 14, 2019.

It stated that over the last 19 years, Cities Alliance has awarded more than 400 grants totalling over $110 million in more than 80 countries, addressing a range of issues including urban poverty, local governance, and climate change.

Source: ThisdayLive

weah_in_studio

Liberia President Launches Low Income Housing in Rural Areas

Liberia President, has launched a housing program for rural dwellers known as the Sasstown development project targeted toward a better living environment.

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The former World best footballer took to his official social media page to make the announcement on Sunday, March 3.

President Weah revealed he was excited with the project expected to improve living condition of Liberians, who will be encouraged to go into agriculture after the residential buildings are ready.

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“I’m excited to announce that my vision to transform the standard of living of our rural dwellers, precisely by upgrading their homes from mud brick homes to concrete homes; has started with the Sasstown development project,” President Weah’s statement read in part.

A further breakdown of the Sasstown development project revealed that existing residential cities will be converted to agricultural zones once the new buildings are completed.

In an effort to avoid demolition of their existing homes; which will prevent them from being homeless during the construction period.

“We have devised a strategy wherein we will build the new homes at a different location; and once the construction is done, they can then move into the newly constructed homes while we demolish the old ones and encourage them to do agriculture at the site of their old homes,” he said.

The President assured Liberians that his government would use every available cent on developing the country..

Source: Legit.ng

Bridging The Housing Deficit In Nigeria.

The issue of housing deficit has been growing from bad to worse and successive governments from the time of Nigeria’s independence 59 years ago have been grappling with this problem . But it seems that they have just been scratching at the surface , especially as the country ’ s population has been growing exponentially, making government ’s efforts in this regard seem ineffectual .

Today , the country ’s housing deficit is about 18 million units , and for a country with a population of nearly 200 million people , it is particularly disheartening . It has been stated that to meet the shortfall , the country will require a minimum of an additional two million housing units per annum for 10 years .
It is instructive to note that the challenge of providing adequate housing accommodation is not just a Nigerian problem . According to the United Nations Habitat , about 30 per cent of the world ’s population live in slums , under deplorable conditions or, worse still , in buildings that are structurally unsound and without security of tenure among others .

The report also stated that 35 per cent of the world ’s rural population live in unacceptable conditions , which means that over two billion people are in need of a better housing.
For Nigeria , the government estimates that the housing sector would need about $ 400 billion investment over the next 25 -30 years to resolve this deficit . The World Bank on the other hand said bridging the deficit will cost the country about N59 .5 trillion , which further tallies with the estimation of the Federal Mortgage Bank of Nigeria which puts it at about N56 trillion to be able to adequately meet the housing needs of Nigerians.
There are several barriers to achieving housing for all . They include the Land Use Act of 1975 , which resides the ownership of land in the state governments, the tedious property registration process , the high cost of building materials , the unabating rural -urban migration and the associated inadequate planning development policy which focuses on urban development to the detriment of the rural areas. There is also the failure of mortgage institutions to fulfil their core mandates .

As a way forward , the National Assembly needs to review the Land Use Act to ease the process of land acquisition and documentation in order to make land more easily available for investment. At the moment it is so cumbersome and fraught with corruption that many investors are frustrated in their attempt to contribute to alleviate the housing burden.


The research institutes should also be challenged and motivated to explore the possibility of coming up with cheaper but equally effective local building materials .
There is also the need to provide the necessary infrastructure and social amenities in the rural areas to improve living conditions there and check the rural -urban movement which helps to complicate the housing problem.

Also , the federal government needs to strengthen and challenge institutions like the Federal Mortgage Bank of Nigeria (FMBN ) , the Federal Mortgage Finance Ltd , the Federal Housing Authority (FHA ) and the Urban Development Bank to deliver on their core mandates .
It is our opinion that bridging the gap of housing deficit as well as providing adequate shelter for Nigerians remain a salient feature of the successes Nigeria hopes to achieve in its quest to become one of the top 20 economies in the world . Thus , creating the right environment for investment in this sector would serve as a lubricant to attaining the set target considering the sector’ s potential for growth . So , if this government and the stakeholders can work together in creating the right environment for local and foreign investment in the sector, the shortfall will be a thing of the past .
It goes without saying that solving the housing deficit is a capital intensive project . It must be backed effectively by a public -private partnership investment model . The public -private partnership should be synergized to turn around the dangerous trend , which in the long run will help to halt the growing numbers of homeless people. On the other hand, the real estate investment firms , which presently account for between four and five per cent of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP ), need to change their business model for increased output, while the government -owned real estate outfits need to be privatised to reduce the deficit from a manageable level.

Source: Leadership.

Developer advises govt on low-cost housing

The Chief Executive Officer, UT Homes, Mr Ade Adebajo, has asked government to focus more attention on providing affordable and low-cost housing for all Nigerians.

He lamented that many Nigerians were suffering from lack of affordable housing in the country and urged the government to come to the rescue of its citizens.

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At the foundation laying/ground breaking ceremony of the construction of 10 units of luxury and affordable bungalows named Campagne De-Maison, by the company in Mowe, Ogun State, Adebajo said private investors had important roles to play in ensuring affordable housing remained available to all Nigerians.

He stated that the public could take advantage of initiatives by investors in the private sector such as the low-cost housing which the company was embarking upon.

He said, “Many Nigerians are still tenants because they cannot afford to own a house. Government should do more to provide cheap and affordable houses for Nigerians as well as provide enabling environment for private investors to thrive. This is the reason UT Homes has embarked on a project of building affordable standard homes for middle and low- income earners.

“The project, a fully furnished gated community, is the first phase of what we are doing and it will be sold within the community. We are targeting middle and low-income earners. We also have provision for mortgages for those who cannot pay once. There is assured security with good sewage system, constant water with excellent finishing. If we go by our projection, the first set of people will move in within the next nine months.”

Adebajo urged Nigerians to take advantage of the opportunity offered by the new development and buy into the project, adding that the government alone would not be able to meet the housing needs of the people.

“It is our own little way of assisting the government. Many of the buildings are already sold out. This is a small development, we are going to do larger one,” he stated.

The company’s Project Manager, Mr Michael Olaiya, said the project would offer the Nigerian public the best in housing revolution.

Source: Maureen Ihua-Maduenyi

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